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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Civilian internment in Britain during the First World War found in the catalog.

Civilian internment in Britain during the First World War

Richard Noschke

Civilian internment in Britain during the First World War

by Richard Noschke

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Published by Anglo-German Family History Society in Cookham, Berks .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statement[by Richard Noschke and Rudolf Rocker].
ContributionsRocker, Rudolf, 1873-1958.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15349973M
ISBN 100951413317

  In , Britain stood at the forefront of organizing one of the first civilian mass internment operations of the 20th century. 30, civilian German, Austrian and Turkish men who had been living or traveling in Britain in the summer of that year found themselves behind barbed wire, in many cases for the whole duration of World War I. This is the first book on these German prisoners, available in paperback, almost a century after the conflict. The book covers the three different types of internees in Britain in the form of: civilians already present in the country in August ; civilians brought to Britain from all.

This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon. Based on research spanning twenty-eight archives in seven countries, this study  explores the connections and continuities, as well as ruptures, between different internment systems at the local, national, regional and imperial levels.   Hello everyone,wonder if anyone can help me with this querie.I know that people were interned in this country in ww2 in various places but did this also happen during the great war,and how do i find out where these internment camps,were.I am interested in .

In , Britain stood at the forefront of organizing one of the first civilian mass internment operations of the 20th century. 30, civilian German, Austrian and Turkish men who had been living or traveling in Britain in the summer of that year found themselves behind barbed wire, in many cases for the whole duration of World War I.   This chapter focuses on internment as an aspect of war governance in five of the main belligerent states: France, Britain, Germany, Austria-Hungary and Ottoman Turkey. Internment and War Governance in the First World War. In: Civilian Internment during the First World War. Palgrave Macmillan, London. First Online 15 November ;Author: Matthew Stibbe.


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Civilian internment in Britain during the First World War by Richard Noschke Download PDF EPUB FB2

During the First World War hundreds of thousands of Germans faced incarceration in hundreds of camps on the British mainland. This is the first book on these German prisoners, almost a Cited by: Enemies in the Empire: Civilian Internment in the British Empire during the First World War - Oxford Scholarship During the First World War, Britain was the epicentre of global mass internment and deportation operations.

Although civilian internment has become associated with the Second World War in popular memory, it has a longer history. The turning point in this history occurred during the First World War when, in the interests of ‘security’ in a situation of total war, the internment of ‘enemy aliens’ became part of state policy for the belligerent states, resulting in the incarceration Brand: Routledge.

Provides the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon. Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days. This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon.

Introduction. This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon. Based on research spanning twenty-eight archives in seven countries, this study explores the connections and continuities, as well as ruptures, between different internment systems at the local, national, regional and imperial levels.

Civilian internment during the First World War: a European and global history, / Matthew Stibbe Author/Creator: Stibbe, Matthew author. Publication: London: Palgrave Macmillan, [], © Format/Description: Book xi, pages ; 23 cm Subjects: World War, -- Concentration camps. World War, -- Evacuation of.

The study argues that the British Empire played a key role in developing civilian internment as a central element of warfare and national security on a global scale. AB - During the First World War, Britain was the epicentre of global mass internment and deportation : Panikos Panayi, Stefan Manz.

Panayi, Panikos. “The Destruction of the German Communities in Britain during the First World War”, in: Germans in Britain since London Hambledon Press ISBN 1 0 Cresswell, Yvonne M., ed. Living with the Wire: Civilian Internment in the Isle of Man during the two World Wars.

Pub: Manx National Heritage (). Although some previous research has been done on German combatant prisoners of war in Britain, this book is the first comprehensive study of civilian internment in the UK during the war and the first to compare the captivity experiences of civilians and : Heather Jones.

During the First World War hundreds of thousands of Germans faced incarceration in hundreds of camps on the British mainland. This is the first book to be published on these German prisoners, almost a century after the conflict.

This account concentrates both upon the bureaucratic decision to introduce internment and the consequences of this government policy for individual lives. 1 Internment during the First World War: A Global Mass Phenomenon 1. Stefan Manz, Panikos Panayi and Matthew Stibbe.

2 The Internment of Civilian ‘Enemy Aliens’ in the British Empire Stefan Manz and Panikos Panayi. 3 Adding Colour to the Silhouettes: The Internment and Treatment   Through inclusion of the last the book is an important development of Panayi’s monograph, The Enemy in Our Midst: Germans in Britain during the First World War, which concentrated solely on German civilian internment experiences.

By categorising German internees, Panayi illuminates a picture of multiple captivity experiences as opposed to a homogenous captivity narrative. Although civilian internment has become associated with the Second World War in popular memory, it has a longer history.

The turning point in this history occurred during the First World War when, in the interests of 'security' in a situation of total war, the internment of 'enemy aliens' became part of state policy for the belligerent states, resulting in the incarceration, displacement and.

With the outbreak of war inan estima German civilians in African and Asian colonies were violently uprooted and imprisoned. Britain's First World War internment of German settlers seriously challenged the structures that underpinned nineteenth-century imperialism. Through its analysis of this internment, this book highlights the impact that the First World War had on the.

This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon. Based on research spanning twenty-eight archives in seven countries, this study explores the connections and continuities, as well as ruptures, between different internment systems at the local, national, regional and imperial levels.

Civilian internment during the First World War: a European and global history, [Matthew Stibbe] This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon.

Britain Germany Austria-Hungary War Governance, Camps and the Turkish Genocide against the Ottoman. During the First World War, all of the belligerent powers interned both civilian and military prisoners.

In Britain alone, over one hundred thousand people were held behind barbed wire. This is the first book on these German prisoners, and covers 3 different types of internees in Britain: civilians already present in the country in August ; civilians brought to Britain from Author: André Keil.

With the outbreak of war inan estima German civilians in African and Asian colonies were violently uprooted and imprisoned. Britain's First World War internment of German settlers seriously challenged the structures that underpinned nineteenth-century by: 3.

Civilian Internment in Scotland during the First World War The article is a regional case study of civilian internment during the First World War. After a brief look at the German migrant community in Scotland prior to the war it explores the mechanics of internment and conditions in the central Scottish internment camp, Stobs near Hawick.

European Colonial Supremacy: The Internment of ‘Enemy Aliens’ in German East Africa during the First World War’, in J. E. Kitchen, A. Miller and L. Rowe, eds., Other Combatants, Other Fronts: Competing Histories of the First World War (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, ), 9 A.

Forth, ‘Britain’s Archipelago of Size: KB.This book is the first major study of civilian internment during the First World War as both a European and global phenomenon.

Based on research spanning twenty-eight archives in seven countries, this study explores the connections and continuities, as well as ruptures, between different internment systems at the local, national, regional and.The hundreds of thousands of German prisoners in Britain during the First World War needed a bureaucracy to control them.

Although the internment system had an element of chaos within it, especially in the early stages of the conflict, by the middle of it operated effectively.